A seminar for all students in the Undergraduate College of Arts, Culture and Humanities. The seminar covers various topics under the general scope of the arts, culture, and humanities. Seminars vary by section and include examination of topics such as performance, philosophy, language arts, cultural studies, theatre arts, dance, music, art, filmmaking, and communications. This course is a graduation requirement for all first year students. Not for credit in addition to GLS 102, HDV 102, ITS 102, LDS 102, SCH 102, or SSO 102.

Creates a curricular component for the second year of the Undergraduate College Experience. College fellows will enroll in ACH 275 in the spring semester of their freshman year and ACH 276 in the fall semester of their sophomore year. 275 (spring) engages students in four main content areas: student development theory, scholarship on mentoring and leadership development, concepts of teaching and learning, and programming and event planning. These areas prepare students for supervised learning and teaching experiences that will occur primarily in the fall 276 course.

The second semester in the sequence following ACH 275. Students assume higher responsibility and are given opportunities to apply teaching theories and concepts as learned in ACH 275. Students act as a TA for ACH 101.

The purpose of this course is to allow upper-division students the opportunity to work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's scheduled Undergraduate College seminars. The student must attend all classes and carry out tasks assigned by the faculty member to assist in teaching the course. The student will meet with the instructor on a regular basis to discuss intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. May be repeated up to a limit of 6 credits.

Students learn about contemporary issues in higher education, community building, and teaching at a research university through hands-on work with faculty mentors. Work assigned will include participation in the planning and operation of events and initiatives sponsored by the Undergraduate Colleges. Students are required to submit written reports on their experiences to the Undergraduate Colleges office and Faculty Directors. May be repeated up to a limit of 6 credits.

A seminar intended to integrate transfer students into the University community by sharing information about Stony Brook and creating a forum to develop intellectual, social, writing, and communication skills. The course emphasizes institutional expectations to promote student success. Recommended for first semester transfer students entering with less than 57 earned credits. Required for all first semester international transfer students. Not for credit in addition to ACH 101, GLS 101, HDV 101, ITS 101, LDS 101, LSE 101, SBU 101, SCH 101, or SSO 101.

This course provides a broad survey of pre-medical studies, preparation for medical school admission, and the medical profession. The course will review medical school admission requirements and procedures, the academic coursework at both the undergraduate and professional school levels, the residency training of the physician, the typical routines of a medical practice, and other issues affecting the training of a medical doctor in the United States. In addition, the class will provide students opportunities for continual self-evaluation of personal motivations to enter the health profession. The course follows the chronological sequence taken by the traditional student to become a licensed medical doctor, and examines how this sequence of events plays an integral role in the development of a capable physician.

Designed to help students develop essential skills needed to become lifelong, self-regulated and self-motivated learners. Through guided journals and assignments, students will use self-reflection to identify possible self sabotaging thoughts and behaviors and discover what may be getting in the way of their academic and personal success. Students will discover how they learn and develop and strengthen their study skills. Topics to be covered include motivation, how memory works, metacognition, critical thinking, decision making, attention and concentration, goal setting, time management and other study skills strategies.

Work as an assistant with an instructor of an ADV 101 regularly scheduled class or with the coordinator/instructor of ADV 488. The student is required to attend all classes, keep current with the regularly assigned work, and meet with the instructor at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course.

Work as an assistant with an instructor of an ADV 101 regularly scheduled class or with the coordinator/instructor of ADV 488. The student is required to attend all classes, keep current with the regularly assigned work, and meet with the instructor at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. The student assumes greater responsibility in such areas as leading discussions and researching class-appropriate topics.

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