The psychological impact of important physiological and sociological events and epochs in the lives of women; menstruation, female sexuality, marriage, childbirth, and menopause; women and mental health, mental illness and psychotherapy; the role of women in the field of psychology. This course is offered as both PSY 347 and WST 377.

Review of current biological and epidemiological knowledge about the HIV virus, and examination of the virus' social impact on the Black community. This course is offered as both AFS 381 and WST 381.

Black women's literature presents students with the opportunity to examine through literature the political, social, and historical experiences of Black women from the African Diaspora. The course is structured around five major themes commonly addressed in Black women's writing: Black female oppression, sexual politics of Black womanhood, Black female sexuality, Black male/female relationships, and Black women and defining self. This course is offered as AFH 382, EGL 382, and WST 382.

Issues of race and gender and how the notion that racism and sexism are analogous forms of oppression aids and detracts from consideration of these issues. Examination of the dynamics of race and gender in various contexts such as activism, art, law, literature, the media, medicine, and philosophy. This course is offered as both PHI 383 and WST 383.

An intensive philosophical study of selected topics of feminist concern. Topics are selected to further the understanding of what effect feminism has upon traditional areas of philosophy as well as providing a detailed understanding of particular feminist theories. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes. This course is offered as both PHI 384 and WST 384.

An examination of gender relations in Latin America, particularly in contemporary societies undergoing rapid social, economic, and political change. The course considers women, work, and family in historical perspective as well as the impact of agrarian change, migration, and industrialization on women. A major focus is on women in political protest and revolution. This course is offered as both HIS 387 and WST 387.

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of specific current topics in women's and gender studies within humanities disciplines such as literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy. Past topics include World Women Writers, Music and Sexuality, Contemporary Memoirs, and Alice Walker. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of specific current topics in women's and gender studies within humanities disciplines such as literature, art, music, religion, and philosophy. Past topics include World Women Writers, Music and Sexuality, Contemporary Memoirs, and Alice Walker. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Current topics in women's studies such as social issues in science or women in science. May be repeated as the topic changes.

Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a topic in women's studies relating to western civilization, specifically within the European tradition. Topics may include, for example, matriarchy and the status and roles of women in early European history, or women and film in Europe. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific descriptions when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

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