This course will examine the key debates and concepts that have informed contemporary articulations of feminist theory. We will focus on how feminist theory is produced, along with gender, through configurations of nation, race, citizenship, sexuality, and class in different historical and cultural contexts. Because of the many varieties of feminist theories, this course may focus on a particular theoretical tradition or conceptual problem. Some examples of past and possible future feminist theories courses include: Feminist Theories/Queer Theories; Feminist Theories: Race, Gender, and Nation; Feminist Theories/Neo-liberal Bio-logics; Feminist Literary Theory; Feminist Science Studies; and Feminism and Psychoanalysis. See addendum C for more detailed descriptions of some sample focused theory classes. Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A,A-,B+, etc.) May be repeated for credit.

This course introduces students to the main currents of feminist social, political, and intellectual theory. It will explore theories and texts and the linkages between developing feminism and such fields as economics, sociology, history, and philosophy. Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Certificate Program in Women's Studies Co-Sceduled with SOC 519. Fall or Spring,

A variable topics seminar course in women's studies for the advanced student. Topics might include feminist peace politics, women in Third World cinema, feminist theology, or feminist philosophy. Course may be repeated as topic varies. Sections of this course are co-scheduled with SOC 509, PHI 615, and PHI 616. Fall or Spring,

A variable topics seminar course in women's studies for the advanced student. Topics might include feminist peace politics, women in Third World cinema, feminist theology, or feminist philosophy. Course may be repeated as topic varies. Sections of this course are co-scheduled with SOC 509, PHI 615, and PHI 616. Fall or Spring,

This seminar is designed as a workshop to apply knowledge of methods and methodologies in the interdisciplinary area of Women's and Gender Studies to students' own research. Course topics will include formulating and refining research questions; developing appropriate theoretical frameworks; articulating scholarly value; and thinking critically about the methods used in feminist interdisciplinary research, across the Humanities, Social Sciences and Sciences. Students are expected to work collaboratively, presenting their individual works-in-progress to the class for constructive critique. Over the semester, students will develop either a research proposal for funding agencies and/or their dissertation proposal (prospectus). Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A,A-,B+, etc.)

A student and faculty member agree on a corpus of texts to read and discuss at weekly or biweekly meetings. The reading list must be filed with the program¿s form before the add/drop period ends. Fall and Spring,1-12 credits, S/U grading. May be repeated for credit.

For doctoral students who have completed all course requirements and wish to dedicate themselves to full- or part-time preparation for the Comprehensive Examination. Fall and Spring, 3, 6, or 9 credits, for a maximum of 18 credits. S/U grading.

The teaching practicum is designed for women's and gender studies certificate students who anticipate teaching classes outside of, or in addition to, their disciplinary home. To help students prepare for this likelihood, we will spend several sessions working together to construct an introductory course syllabus in Women's and Gender Studies. At the same time, we will consider broader questions about the university as an institution in the current moment, and the place of Women's and Gender Studies within the contemporary university. Along with a consideration of the changing practices and objects of feminist knowledge production, we will also discuss the changing politics and economics of academia, and the impact of the wider academic milieu on what and how knowledge is produced. We will ask: what has women's studies been; what kinds of interdisciplinarity or transdisciplinarity are possible in women's and gender studies; and finally, what might women's and gender studies become? Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy (G5). A portion of dissertation research must take place on SBU campus. Fall, Spring, and Summer 1-12 credits, S/U grading May be repeated for credit

Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor. Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring Summer Prerequisite: G5 Standing 1-9 credits, S/U grading May be repeated for credit

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